Paper Presenters Price
(2019045) DATA SHARING - PROS, CONS, AND HOW TO LEVERAGE

Success in the oil and gas industry comes with effectively juggling four key elements: money (made or lost), risk, technical capability, and competition. Information is key to managing this process. Data sharing is the controlled process of providing information to and obtaining information from your competitors in such a manner to ensure your success (and theirs, as well). When well executed, data sharing can help one optimally find and develop highly profitable properties with minimal risk for failure. Unfortunately, poorly executed, the data sharing process can tilt the pursuit in the other direction, as well. This paper was prepared to provide the reader with an understanding of the data sharing process and how to effectively leverage information to succeed in such a competitive and technically challenging environment. There are many data sources available, with varying degrees of cost and value. A great deal of data is available for free from public sources, in a variety of formats. There is also an entire industry made up of companies that, for a fee, provide consistent methods to retrieve public data. They also provide value-added services to validate, scrub, and, sometimes, interpret the data. There are also services to find relevant information or, if necessary, to generate data. Each of these methods incurs some cost, whether it be directly financial, in terms of effort, or risk (due to reliability concerns). A great advantage of these methods is that there is no need to release valuable data to one’s competitors. The disadvantage is that a great deal of valuable information is not available via these avenues. This is where data sharing comes in, from consortia to directly sharing with potential competitors. Data sharing can be extremely valuable, not only in obtaining data but also in developing relationships that build information conduits and can lead to profitable operations that can only be pursued with a partner. While there is considerable value to this approach, there are challenges and hazards that need to be navigated. This paper describes the various methods of retrieving, purchasing, and sharing data and how to utilize data sharing as a mechanism to effectively compete in a challenging environment.


Jim Browning, Texas Tech University

$7.50
DATA SHARING - PROS, CONS, AND HOW TO LEVERAGE
DATA SHARING - PROS, CONS, AND HOW TO LEVERAGE
Price
$7.50
(2019050) DATA-DRIVEN PROGNOSTIC METHOD FOR EQUIPMENT IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY

Catastrophic accidents in offshore drilling operations have greatly endangered human lives, environment and capital assets. Although risks in offshore oil and gas operations cannot be completely eliminated, a substantial amount of risks can be minimized through preventive and mitigative measures. A key aspect of the offshore drilling risk is the reliability of drilling systems. According to the World Offshore Accident Dataset and many other investigations, the overwhelming majority of disastrous accidents in offshore drilling operations were caused by equipment failures and human errors. The capabilities to predict the lifetime and provide early and effective warnings in real time are crucial to ensure reliable and safe offshore operations. The objective of this research is to mitigate offshore drilling risks by developing a scientific framework for data-driven failure prognosis for complex drilling systems operating in heterogeneous and extremely harsh environments. A novel data-driven reliability model in conjunction with a systems and economic impact analysis is developed integrating multi-source (e.g., operations and maintenance records, in-situ monitoring data) and multi-modal (e.g., lifetime data, degradation profiles) data. Numerical cases studies will be presented to demonstrate the proposed method. 

 


Yisha Xiang, Mario Beruvides and Lloyd Heinze
Texas Tech University

$7.50
DATA-DRIVEN PROGNOSTIC METHOD FOR EQUIPMENT IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY
DATA-DRIVEN PROGNOSTIC METHOD FOR EQUIPMENT IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY
Price
$7.50
(2019037) DETERMINING OPTIMIZED GAS INJECTION RATE FOR GAS LIFTED WELLS TO MAXIMIZE LIFT EFFICIENCY

Problem being addressed: Determining optimized Gas Injection Rate for Gas Lifted wells to maximize lift efficiency. Challenges: While Gas Lift is the most natural artificial lift method, ever-changing surface and downhole conditions cause significant inefficiencies. The changing conditions require frequent adjustments to surface-injected gas rates to maintain the most efficient lifting gradient. If the proper adjustments are not made, these inefficiencies may hinder production and increase lease operating expenses. Solution: By using Apergy’s proprietary hunting algorithm, Bloodhound, optimal gas injections rates are determined by the magnitude in the bottom hole pressure drawdown, with use of a permeant down hole gauge. Through continuous and proportional rate adjustment, the Bloodhound algorithm learns from previous set point deltas and tests against the inferred optimal rate, as well as changing conditions. Results: In under-injection scenarios, Bloodhound can accelerate the recovery of oil by up to 10 percent, regardless of the well’s position on its natural decline. In over-injecting scenarios, wells can maintain oil production rates while using up to 50 percent lift gas. Both results can be successfully achieved with few engineering hours, manually calculating or modeling well performance curves to determine inferred optimal rate. 

 


Dustin Sandidge, Apergy

$7.50
DETERMINING OPTIMIZED GAS INJECTION RATE FOR GAS LIFTED WELLS TO MAXIMIZE LIFT EFFICIENCY
DETERMINING OPTIMIZED GAS INJECTION RATE FOR GAS LIFTED WELLS TO MAXIMIZE LIFT EFFICIENCY
Price
$7.50
(2019032) DEVELOPMENT OF A ROD GUIDE MODEL WHICH GENERATES A MINIMUM LEVEL OF TURBULENCE, PERFORMING CFD ANALYSIS AND HYDRODYNAMIC COMPARISONS BETWEEN DIFFERENT GUIDE DESIGNS

A hydrodynamic analysis for different rod guide designs simulating downhole fluid conditions was made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, which is widely used for solving the partial differential equations of fluid motion by discrete approximation.  A particular turbulence kinetic energy graphic for each guide sample was created and compared to each other. The results shows a significant difference between the samples and the new rod guide design with conclusive proof of a better hydrodynamic performance. 


Ricardo Padron, Tenaris

$7.50
DEVELOPMENT OF A ROD GUIDE MODEL WHICH GENERATES A MINIMUM LEVEL OF TURBULENCE, PERFORMING CFD ANALYSIS AND HYDRODYNAMIC COMPARISONS BETWEEN DIFFERENT GUIDE DESIGNS
DEVELOPMENT OF A ROD GUIDE MODEL WHICH GENERATES A MINIMUM LEVEL OF TURBULENCE, PERFORMING CFD ANALYSIS AND HYDRODYNAMIC COMPARISONS BETWEEN DIFFERENT GUIDE DESIGNS
Price
$7.50
(2019024) DOG LEG SEVERITY (DLS) AND SIDE LOAD (SL) RECOMMENDATIONS

Dog Leg Severity (DLS) had been used for many decades as recommendations to try to drill oil and gas wells and provide "trouble free" operating conditions. Many of these recommendations were historically based on vertical, shallow (<5000 ft.) deep wells. But as wells continued to be drilled deeper, the recommendations were still applied. With the current drilling and operating practices of deviated and/or horizontal wells, these recommendations may no longer be applicable. Additionally, the deviation measurement interval (degrees/100 ft.) also may no longer be accurate when trying to match downhole problems using existing rod string design software. Furthermore, as wells have become deeper and many now also exclusively are drilled as deviated/ horizontal, side loading (SL) may be a more appropriate condition to be used to determine problems. This paper will review the historic DLS recommendations, provide insight on deviation measurement interval, discuss the importance of SL, and provide new recommendations for drilling wells that should provide better, longer term, less problematic operating wells.


Norm Hein, Oil & Gas Optimization Specialist, Ltd.
Lynn Rowlan, Echometer Company

$7.50
DOG LEG SEVERITY (DLS) AND SIDE LOAD (SL) RECOMMENDATIONS
DOG LEG SEVERITY (DLS) AND SIDE LOAD (SL) RECOMMENDATIONS
Price
$7.50
(2019017) DOWNHOLE EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT GUIDELINES

In 2017 and 2018 Oxy EOR conducted a series of RCFA schools. As part of these schools, information was gathered on the range of equipment replacement for failure types. In 2018, a cross functional team of experienced stakeholders vetted this information and compiled a list of equipment replacement guidelines. This paper will share these guidelines. 


Steve Reed, Calvin Stewart, Steve Gault, Saul Tovar, Joel Gallegos and Rynn Peeler
OXY USA Inc.

$7.50
DOWNHOLE EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT GUIDELINES
DOWNHOLE EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT GUIDELINES
Price
$7.50
(2019047) DYNAMIC FILTRATION TEST EXPERIMENTS DESIGN

The purpose of this project is to conduct a Dynamic Filtration Test to Investigate the Effect of Preformed Particle Gels (PPGs) on Un-swept, Low-Permeable Zones/Areas. A filtration test is a simple means of evaluating formation damage. This work use schematically dynamic filtration test experiment design apparatus to carry out the various filtration test experiments. It use different core samples, various brine concentration, and various gel types.  The permeability   of each sandstone core samples is calculated before and after the filtration test. Experiments are still being observed.  The objective of this study is to find methods that minimized the damage caused by PPGs on un-swept, low-permeable zones/areas, thus improving PPG treatment efficiency. This approach will identify the best properties of the PPGs, which can neither penetrate conventional solid rocks nor form cakes on the rocks’ surface. 

 


Mahmoud Elsharafi, Jenom Pyeng , Tapiwa Gasseler, and Jedeshkeran Chandraseqaran
Midwestern State University

$7.50
DYNAMIC FILTRATION TEST EXPERIMENTS DESIGN
DYNAMIC FILTRATION TEST EXPERIMENTS DESIGN
Price
$7.50
(2019053) EFFECTIVENESS OF HIGH VISCOSITY FRICTION REDUCERS IN PERMIAN WELL COMPLETIONS

Friction reducer is a hydraulic fracturing fluid additive meant to lower costs by decreasing the friction pressure in tubulars during pumping operations. High viscosity friction reducers (HVFRs) have become increasingly popular in well stimulation applications in lieu of conventional slick water fluid systems involving linear and cross-linked gels. However, various factors must be considered when assessing the effectiveness of using HVFRs under certain frac operation conditions. This paper aims to evaluate how effective of a solution HVFRs are while determining the optimal operating conditions for this additive.


Omar Zeinuddin, Texas Tech University

$7.50
EFFECTIVENESS OF HIGH VISCOSITY FRICTION REDUCERS IN PERMIAN WELL COMPLETIONS
EFFECTIVENESS OF HIGH VISCOSITY FRICTION REDUCERS IN PERMIAN WELL COMPLETIONS
Price
$7.50
(2019046) ENERGY FROM SALTWATER MUD

There is a growing need for energy throughout the world and this increase in demand for energy has now also put a strain on the current sources of energy. In the process of oil/gas production, there are large amounts of water released into the atmosphere as well as into the ground or soil. This water contains chemicals such as Sulphur and Nitrogen oxides, Bitumen, Calcium, Base oil, and Sodium. It is commonly referred to as “wastewater” and is disposed of. The goal of this project is to investigate the possibility of acquiring energy from this wastewater. This is can be done by using various types of soils and water. Various mixtures were created using soils mixed with different percentages of clay and water with varying salinity. A small source of electricity was then applied to the saltwater mud to provide a voltage to the experiment. The chemicals in the mud are then expected to amplify the input voltage and create enough energy to power electrical devices. To prove this, a bulb or small fan will be connected to the mud via an electrode. It was found that clay soil produced more energy than sandy soil. Also, an increase in water volume would dilute the mixture and this would slow down the transfer of energy in the mud. The results of this work can be useful for the environment and the decreasing energy sources.


Mahmoud Elsharafie, Kelton Vidal and Chiedza Tokonyai
Midwestern State University

$7.50
ENERGY FROM SALTWATER MUD
ENERGY FROM SALTWATER MUD
Price
$7.50
(2019023) ENERGY SAVINGS ON BEAM PUMP SUCKER ROD SYSTEMS / CONTROL SOLUTIONS WITH FIELD CASE STUDIES

One of the largest lease operating expenses is electrical cost. Only a small portion of electrical cost is value-added conversion of electricity to fluid lifting power. The rest is lost to downhole friction, fluid flow friction, pumping unit, and electrical to mechanical power conversion inefficiencies.  Overall “line to fluid” system efficiency will typically range from 20% to 40%. Some cases will be as low as 10%.



Some of those energy losses are inevitable.  Some can be reduced through improved operation and controls. This paper will present power studies of various control schemes on actual wells, highlighting the best solutions for reducing power consumption. 



The study will examine: line starters with timers, line starters with pump off controllers, pump off controllers with variable speed drives and advanced embedded controllers. Electrical average voltage(V), power factor, maximum current(A), average current(A), total apparent power(KVA), total reactive power(KVAR) and total real power(KW) will be show for each variation. Apparent costs and ROI of implementing and/or changing to a new control system will be presented.    


Jordan Hanson, Control Solutions

Unico

Hy-Bon/EDI

$7.50
ENERGY SAVINGS ON BEAM PUMP SUCKER ROD SYSTEMS / CONTROL SOLUTIONS WITH FIELD CASE STUDIES
ENERGY SAVINGS ON BEAM PUMP SUCKER ROD SYSTEMS / CONTROL SOLUTIONS WITH FIELD CASE STUDIES
Price
$7.50
(2019003) EVALUATION OF C GRADE RODS AND T COUPLING USAGE IN SAN ANDRES CONVENTIONAL

In 2016, a recommendation was made in EOR to begin utilizing Grade “C” when replacing rods in San Andres wells or wells less than 5,000’ deep. The advantage of the Grade “C” rods believed to be better corrosion resistance, tubing leak reduction, and lower material cost. It was also recommended that “T” coupling be considered as an alternative to Spray Metal (“SM”) couplings as they are softer and should fail preferentially to the tubing. As with any technology that is new to the field in question there is concern about wide spread use until sufficient data is gathered on a smaller subset of wells to prove up the concept. As failure frequency is a key metric when evaluating artificial lift performance, and it can take several years to develop sufficient data, an analysis method needed to be utilized to track the equipment performance over a shorter duration so that use can be expanded as early as possible. This was accomplished by developing statistical data for sucker rod and coupling installations and failures over a specific time period comparing the failure rate of the “C” rods and “T” couplings versus the “KD” rods and “SM” couplings that are typically run. The analysis showed that the “C” grade rods and “SM” couplings were not showing an increased failure rate and therefore provided support to start expanding their use in EOR, which should result in significant cost savings. To further understand the corrosion differences between C-Rods and KD-Rods corrosion coupons were constructed from sections of actual rods and placed in several wells of varying characteristics. This paper will also present the findings from this corrosion test, which is currently nearing completion. 


Garrett Best, Steven Reedy, Calvin Stewart and Steve Gault
OXY USA, Inc.

$7.50
EVALUATION OF C GRADE RODS AND T COUPLING USAGE IN SAN ANDRES CONVENTIONAL
EVALUATION OF C GRADE RODS AND T COUPLING USAGE IN SAN ANDRES CONVENTIONAL
Price
$7.50
(2019036) EXAMPLES OF FORCES NOT ACCOUNTED FOR BY THE WAVE EQUATION

Different types of forces NOT accounted for by the wave equation are 1) mechanical friction, 2) piston force acting on the polished rod due to tubing back pressure and 3) true vertical rod weight.  Mechanical friction will be discussed from 1) over-tight stuffing box, 2) down hole sticking due to a severe dogleg in the wellbore profile and 3) friction from paraffin along a section of the rod string.  The application of these external mechanical forces acting on the rod string impacts measured surface loads, down hole stroke length and plunger velocity, plus the calculated rod loading at the pump or other locations in the rod string.   

Damping coefficients are used to subtract out fluid damping as a function of velocity along the rod string using the wave equation.  Unaccounted for mechanical friction cannot be modeled by adjusting the damping factors in the wave equation.  Mechanical friction impacts both the shape of the pump card and the measured surface dynamometer card loads versus position and, as friction on the rods goes up then the surface load range also changes.  Field measured dynamometer data will be used to show examples of these different types of forces NOT accounted for by the wave equation

 


O. Lynn Rowlan, Carrie Anne Taylor and Ken Skinner
Echometer Company
Clint Haskins, Fluid Finder
 

$7.50
EXAMPLES OF FORCES NOT ACCOUNTED FOR BY THE WAVE EQUATION
EXAMPLES OF FORCES NOT ACCOUNTED FOR BY THE WAVE EQUATION
Price
$7.50
(2019008) FIELD-DRIVEN INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE ARTIFICIAL LIFT EFFICIENCY AND RELIABILITY WITH AN ENGINEERED SUCKER ROD PUMP BALL VALVE INSERT

To increase recovery rates – the greatest challenge facing the industry – operators must not only look to step-change technologies, but improvements to existing technology. Even incremental increases in recovery rates can impact economics when multiplied across numerous wells. For example, approximately two-thirds of onshore wells use beam operated pump jacks with reciprocating rod pumps. Our objective was to improve the efficiency and reliability of sucker pumps by engineering a new ball valve insert.  Prototype testing demonstrated that the lowest pressure drop was provided by an insert design with the tangent angle equal to Pi (3.14, π), as it forced the fluid into a vortex spin. Based on a number of flow rates (including two phase flow) the TangentFlow Insert decreased pressure drop by 40% on average resulting in 58% more flow than the bar-bottom inserts. In addition, compared to the bar-bottom inserts, which produced significant ball chatter, the TangentFlow Insert had a consistently low decibel reading with increasing flow rates, as the ball remained stationary. This results in reduced gas breakout, which in turn further reduces pressure drop, fluid pound and pump damage.  One-year field results from 50 wells in the Red River reservoir of Montana and North Dakota demonstrate that the TangentFlow Insert reduced pressure drop across both the standing and traveling valves to increase average surface flow by 8%. Considering the average water to oil ratio in the area, this provides an additional 3.1 bbl/day/well. This increase applied over 50 wells translates to approximately 54,603 bbl/year, or $3.33MM in revenue at current oil prices.  The design of the TangentFlow Insert improves the efficiency and reliability of sucker rod pumps by minimizing the effects of pressure drop, gas breakout, solids accumulation (wax), casing wear and ball wear, which together improve pump efficiency and production flow. Because the design enables the ball to remain stationary, smaller and lighter balls can be used, allowing for higher flowback solids and reduced cage wear, respectively. The TangentFlow Insert is manufactured to replace conventional bar-bottom inserts without needing to change out the entire pump assembly, making them applicable to 90% of pumps presently used in the industry.


Corbin Coyes, TangentFlow Inc.

$7.50
FIELD-DRIVEN INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE ARTIFICIAL LIFT EFFICIENCY AND RELIABILITY WITH AN ENGINEERED SUCKER ROD PUMP BALL VALVE INSERT
FIELD-DRIVEN INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE ARTIFICIAL LIFT EFFICIENCY AND RELIABILITY WITH AN ENGINEERED SUCKER ROD PUMP BALL VALVE INSERT
Price
$7.50
(39) FORECASTING THE RESERVOIR DATA OF OILFIELD IN LIBYA BY USING DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS

Decline Curves Analysis commonly ordinarily applied to evaluate the original hydrocarbon in place, hydrocarbon reserves, and forecasting future production performance. The Decline Curves Analysis development was presented by Johnson and Bollens in (1928) and later on (1945) which is called "loss-ratio". Many discussions of the mathematical relationship between the past time, production rate, and the cumulative production depend on the decline rate. Decline Curve Analysis is a technique which might be stratified for a single well or whole reservoir by either production engineer or reservoir engineer. In oil industry, remaining reserves are the substantial target. The objective of this study is to determine and clear estimation of a reservoir performance in Libyan Oilfields by using Decline Curves Analysis and estimate the reservoir life. Also, in this work we simulate the production operation data to find out the better matching of forecasting results and the economic impact of the selected reservoir. This research is an attempt to determine one of Libyan reservoir performance and determine which one of the three classifications of the Decline Curves are Exponential, Hyperbolic, and/or Harmonic by using one of the most widespread important reliable methods to estimate the depletion of reservoir pressure with the consideration of the method limitations, the changes in the facilities downstream, and hydrocarbons production rate.


Mahmoud Elsharafi, Mohamed Hussen Masuad, and Faisal Bergigh
Midwestern State University
 

$7.50
FORECASTING THE RESERVOIR DATA OF OILFIELD IN LIBYA BY USING DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS
FORECASTING THE RESERVOIR DATA OF OILFIELD IN LIBYA BY USING DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS
Price
$7.50
(2019005) GROUNDING FOR ESP LIGHTNING PROTECTION

How and where ground wires are connected determines the runtime and successful withstanding of switching and lightning surges. This is extremely evident with lightning protection of electric submersible pumps (ESP).  Electric surge suppressors on the same ground wire can and will interact bidirectionally in a lightning storm. Instances of ESP failures due to improperly installed surge suppression are not uncommon.  Understandably the value of surge suppression has been questioned.  This paper proposes separate ground wires for each surge device with all wires bonded together at the wellhead.  Justification for this is derived from multiple engineering reports on wellsite electrical installations, electrical theory and reported extended ESP run-life.


Tom Brinner, Subsaver, LLC
Don Parrott, G&W Consulting

$7.50
GROUNDING FOR ESP LIGHTNING PROTECTION
GROUNDING FOR ESP LIGHTNING PROTECTION
Price
$7.50
(2019030) HIGH RATE UNCONVENTIONAL GAS LIFT

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the history of different gas lift design methods and the theory behind a new design method.  In January 2019, Production Lift Companies and Concho Resources ran a new gas lift design method in two unconventional wells in the Permian Basin.  This new method is designed to exploit the initial high bottom hole pressure in unconventional wells to produce higher rates that, before now, were only possible with an ESP.  This life of well design will also follow the well’s decline and efficiently produce the well at lower rates.  When completed correctly, the well can be switched to PAGL, Plunger Lift or GAPL without pulling the tubing.  



The traditional gas lift design method for unconventional wells is to run unloading valves until you reach a minimum spacing of 500’ (Fig. 1) and then continue the 500’ spacing to the packer.  The 500’ spacing was adopted by the industry in the late 80’s as “Best Practice” and has remained the standard today. 

 


Jay Miller, Production Lift Companies
Kenneth Estrada, Concho

$7.50
HIGH RATE UNCONVENTIONAL GAS LIFT
HIGH RATE UNCONVENTIONAL GAS LIFT
Price
$7.50
(2019049) IMPACT OF PRODUCED WATER ON THE CORROSION OF STEEL BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

The perceived impact of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the corrosion of steel used in the oil patch has been a controversial issue for many years.   Although a few studies on this issue have been published, those results have been contradictory. As concerns surrounding this issue continue to be raised, a systematic study has been undertaken to understand the corrosive effects of ClO2 towards steel in various produced waters.  Research shows that the baseline corrosion rate of untreated produced water is related to TDS, with other factors being involved, such as the presence of H2S and iron. This paper summarizes the results of other studies that have been done, and demonstrates the contradictory nature of such studies. The results of this on-going study show the relationship between the TDS of produced water and corrosion resulting from use of varying concentrations of ClO2.  The paper explains the contradictory nature of corrosion caused by ClO2.


Greg Simpson, Purleline Treatment Systems

$7.50
IMPACT OF PRODUCED WATER ON THE CORROSION OF STEEL BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE
IMPACT OF PRODUCED WATER ON THE CORROSION OF STEEL BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE
Price
$7.50
(2019020) INNOVATIVE PACKER TYPE GAS SEPARATOR:  OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND DESIGN CRITERIA

Wells with high depletion rate present high free gas at pump intake conditions. In all cases, the production of fluid with a high gas-liquid ratio leads to an inefficient performance of the rod pump systems. The initial solution to this problem is the installation of poor boy gas separators which capacity of gas separation is reduced and do not provide a high-performance solution.  Packer type gas separators are the most efficient downhole separators in the market, however, they usually have some operational limitations. This paper summarizes a new design of the packer type gas separator which uses more methods of separation than the traditional design and can be designed based on the conditions of each well overcoming the typical limitations. The design criteria are reviewed, and some operational guidelines are listed to reach the best performance in each application for gas separation.


Gustavo Gonzalez, Shivani Vyas, Luis Guanacas Neil Johnson
Odessa Separator Inc.

$7.50
INNOVATIVE PACKER TYPE GAS SEPARATOR:  OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND DESIGN CRITERIA
INNOVATIVE PACKER TYPE GAS SEPARATOR:  OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND DESIGN CRITERIA
Price
$7.50
(2019034) IRIS: A NEW ERA IN DOWNHOLE DATA TREATMENT

When optimizing a reciprocating rod lift installation, key control parameters must be extracted from the downhole data. Traditionally, downhole data in the form of position and load data is derived from surface data using the wave equation. Downhole position and load data must be carefully analyzed to extract key control parameters for reciprocating rod lift optimization.

IRIS introduces a new and innovative approach for downhole data analysis.





Through a change in coordinate system, IRIS transforms downhole position and load data into polar coordinates. This change in coordinates creates three new data sets, which greatly simplify the extraction of the above mentioned key control parameters.

Additionally, IRIS can be used to manage both viscous and mechanical friction through an extra friction detection algorithm and a viscous damping estimator.





In this paper, the IRIS algorithms and results are presented.

 


Victoria Pons, Baker Hughes, A GE Company

$7.50
IRIS: A NEW ERA IN DOWNHOLE DATA TREATMENT
IRIS: A NEW ERA IN DOWNHOLE DATA TREATMENT
Price
$7.50
(2019018) ITS ALL ABOUT THE END FITTING 3: PRESSURE DROP, EXTRA CORROSION CAPABILITY, COMPRESSION HANDLING

As fluctuations in oil price continue, the industry has changed and is demanding improvements from each method of artificial lift. Required flow rates are increasing due to the longer laterals of new horizontal wells being added to inventory. Rod Lift is not immune and is being asked to enter the artificial lift cycle earlier and support the pumping of wellbores with added complexities due to geometries and/or production demands. The fiber reinforced plastic (fiberglass, FSR) rod continues to meet the ever-increasing demand and complexities. The two previous editions of ‘IT’S ALL ABOUT THE END FITTING’ focused on the design of the new generation of fiberglass rod, the added strength the industry has requested, the benefits regarding the handling of compression and methods to mitigate uncertainties of the wellbore dynamics. This edition will focus on benefits of the latest generation of the end fitting. It will explain how a new configuration of the wedge profile provides reduced pressure drop at each connection and/or adds corrosion resilience. The new wedge profile also increases the ability of the end fitting to handle compression. Data will be provided in support of increased production. The fiberglass rods have been delivering benefits for the last 30+ years to the industry and continue to maintain pace with growing demands of artificial lift through innovation and development of new generation FSRs. With an ongoing progress of FSR technology the glass rods are being adopted earlier in the well’s life cycle requiring us to make the product RUN LONGER & PRODUCE 


Ryan Gernentz, Karol Hricisak and Alex Booth
Endurance Lift Solutions

$7.50
ITS ALL ABOUT THE END FITTING 3: PRESSURE DROP, EXTRA CORROSION CAPABILITY, COMPRESSION HANDLING
ITS ALL ABOUT THE END FITTING 3: PRESSURE DROP, EXTRA CORROSION CAPABILITY, COMPRESSION HANDLING
Price
$7.50
(2019014) LEARNING IN TEXAS DELAWARE ROD PUMPING EXPERIENCE

Oxy Resources established the Texas Delaware Team in April 2013 when ~200 wells were purchased in the area of Pecos, Texas.  These primarily vertical wells produce from various commingled Delaware intervals located at 8,000’ to 12,000’ deep. The nature and deviation of these wells have made rod pumping them challenging and failure frequencies have been as high as 1.5 failures/year. Many lessons have been learned in driving the failure frequencies down to the current level of 1.0 failures/year. This paper will share some of the lessoned learned using various equipment types including fiberglass COROD, Poly-keytone Lined Tubing,  Poly-keytone Rod Glides, and Variable Slippage Pumps. 


Steve Gault and Tyler Anderson
OXY USA, Inc.

$7.50
LEARNING IN TEXAS DELAWARE ROD PUMPING EXPERIENCE
LEARNING IN TEXAS DELAWARE ROD PUMPING EXPERIENCE
Price
$7.50
(2019043) MANIPULATING CASING PRESSURE TO BETTER HANDLE GAS IN CERTAIN WELL TYPES

Rod pumps are not the ideal system of lift when it comes to handling gas. We can only do so much with the configuration downhole especially for wells with open hole completions. Despite the limited options, we are coming to find that we can do better by manipulating parameters at the surface. Historically, we have manipulated back pressure on the tubing in order to control when gas breaks out of solution in the tubing. Now we are finding, on certain well types, that manipulating back pressure on the casing in order to keep gas in solution through the pump is proving to be successful. By doing this, we are seeing beam wells that now face less equipment stress due to gas interference, more consistent, stable run time and production on a daily basis, and even optimized inflow where production increases for wells. 


Blake Whittington, OXY USA Inc.

$7.50
MANIPULATING CASING PRESSURE TO BETTER HANDLE GAS IN CERTAIN WELL TYPES
MANIPULATING CASING PRESSURE TO BETTER HANDLE GAS IN CERTAIN WELL TYPES
Price
$7.50
(2019041) MAXIMIZING PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY IN BEAM PUMP WELLS USING ROD GUIDE DESIGN OPTIMIZATION

There are many challenges associated with sucker rod lift in deviated wellbores that can lead to high failure rates and lost production. Tubing failures are amongst the costliest workovers and are often a result of metal to metal contact between the rod coupling and the tubing. Evaluating tubing on-site using both gamma and electromagnetic inspection allows for proper design optimization before returning to production. The tubing scan can be aligned with deviation data, previous rod design, and failure history to adjust the string design to effectively extend mean time between failures and improve asset value. An effective rod guide strategy was developed to mitigate tubing wear using proper guide type, material, and placement. The implementation of this strategy has helped to maximize production efficiency across the asset. 


Brian Wagner, NOV Tuboscope

$7.50
MAXIMIZING PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY IN BEAM PUMP WELLS USING ROD GUIDE DESIGN OPTIMIZATION
MAXIMIZING PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY IN BEAM PUMP WELLS USING ROD GUIDE DESIGN OPTIMIZATION
Price
$7.50
(2019022) MICRO-ENCAPSULATED TECHNOLOGY: NEW CHEMICAL TREATMENT FOR DOWNHOLE

The common surface chemical applications cannot reach or have low efficiency due to high fluid levels. This paper Introduces a new chemical technology for all types of artificial lift systems that guarantees an efficient downhole treatment at the entry point and summarizes the applications of this revolutionary method established to deliver chemical combinations by microencapsulating the compounds and packaging the completed formulation in a chemical screen that is placed at the bottom of the tubing (BHA) below any type of artificial lift systems. The new downhole Chemical treatment technology were designed and successfully applied in 3 wells in the Permian Basin to control scale and corrosion. The installation of the chemical tool is easily made up below the pump intake and not additional equipment is needed in the pump or in the surface facilities.


Gustavo Gonzalez, Renzo Arias, Luis Guanacas 
Odessa Separator Inc.

$7.50
MICRO-ENCAPSULATED TECHNOLOGY: NEW CHEMICAL TREATMENT FOR DOWNHOLE
MICRO-ENCAPSULATED TECHNOLOGY: NEW CHEMICAL TREATMENT FOR DOWNHOLE
Price
$7.50
(01) INTELLIGENT ROD LIFT SYSTEM: FAULT DETECTION AND ACCOMMODATION

 Unplanned rod lift system outages often lead to long and costly repairs in addition to direct production loss. Leveraging design knowledge of the rod lift system combined with real-time condition monitoring represents a promising avenue to mitigate this problem. This study will demonstrate an application of advanced monitoring and diagnostic analytics on data from vibration, strain, current and voltage sensors installed in critical locations of a beam pumping unit.


 


When pumping conditions deviate from the norm, the operators are alerted with regard to pending failures, and a supervisory control layer takes immediate action to adjust the operational pumping speed profile to maintain production at a safe operational level or shut down the equipment in the event of imminent catastrophic failure.


 


This paper will review the sensor installations and data acquisition approach. Experimental field test results will be presented and discussed.


Omar Al Assad, Justin Barton, Rogier Blom, Ravi YB, Mahalakshmi SB GE Global Research Gary Hughes, Eric Oestrich, Peter Westerkamp and Craig Foster GE Lufkin Automation $7.50
Paper: (01) INTELLIGENT ROD LIFT SYSTEM: FAULT DETECTION AND ACCOMMODATION
Paper: (01) INTELLIGENT ROD LIFT SYSTEM: FAULT DETECTION AND ACCOMMODATION
Price
$7.50